Grants For Capitol Forest

Capitol Forest's DNR Recreational Managers are submitting several grants to help pay for improvements and resources in Capitol Forest. The importance of this work can't be overstated, and we hope all of these grants receive funding. But, every year far more grants are submitted than the available funding. Your support for these projects will help up the chances that these projects succeed. Please take the time to write letters of support for ALL of these grants!

RCO # 18-2466: New Capitol Forest Non-Motorized Trails 

The Department of Natural Resources will use this grant for a development project which will expand the mileage for the non-motorized trail system in Capitol State Forest near Olympia. Non-motorized trail-based recreation continues to grow in Capitol Forest and the overall goal of this project is to disperse non-motorized use across the forest and provide additional loop and stacked loop routes within the trail system. This project will benefit hikers, mountain bikers, trail runners, & equestrians who recreate in Capitol Forest and provide them with both shorter and longer loop options from multiple trailheads throughout the forest.

RCO # 18-2465 Capitol Forest ORV Trail and Facility Maintenance

The Department of Natural Resources will use this grant to conduct maintenance on 83 miles of two track and single track ORV trails and 3 support facilities within Capitol State Forest. Trail maintenance will include: brushing, installing drainage features, trail hardening where necessary, installation of geo-synthetics, constructing small re-routes, bridge maintenance and sign installation. Trailhead and facility maintenance includes upkeep of: restrooms, campsites, parking areas and signs. This grant will fund a year around equipment operator and seasonal crews. The equipment operator will work with and support volunteers to perform trail maintenance. The primary recreation opportunity provided by this project is sustainable and more enjoyable ORV trails and support facilities. Many mountain bike and trail running enthusiasts enjoy the ORV trails as well. Electric (ebike) bicycle use is allowed on ORV trails in the forest and is becoming a more popular form of recreation. 

In addition to motorized use the ORV trails are frequently used by mountain bikers and trail runners.

RCO # 18-2465 Capitol Forest ORV Trail and Facility Maintenance

The Department of Natural Resources will use this grant to conduct maintenance on 83 miles of two track and single track ORV trails and 3 support facilities within Capitol State Forest. Trail maintenance will include: brushing, installing drainage features, trail hardening where necessary, installation of geo-synthetics, constructing small re-routes, bridge maintenance and sign installation. Trailhead and facility maintenance includes upkeep of: restrooms, campsites, parking areas and signs. This grant will fund a year around equipment operator and seasonal crews. The equipment operator will work with and support volunteers to perform trail maintenance. The primary recreation opportunity provided by this project is sustainable and more enjoyable ORV trails and support facilities. Many mountain bike and trail running enthusiasts enjoy the ORV trails as well. Electric (ebike) bicycle use is allowed on ORV trails in the forest and is becoming a more popular form of recreation. 

In addition to motorized use the ORV trails are frequently used by mountain bikers and trail runners.

RCO # 18-2463 Capitol Forest Education and Enforcement

RCO # 18-2463 Capitol Forest Education and Enforcement

The Department of Natural Resources (DNR) will use this grant to conduct education and enforcement (E&E) operations in Capitol State Forest, which is located near Olympia. The grant will fund one full-time and one half time E&E warden. The Capitol Forest has 160 miles of trail, 4 campgrounds, 6 trailheads and 560 miles of open forest roads.

The recreation wardens, will focus on ORV use compliance, identifying and correcting safety issues for all trail and road users. Additionally, the warden will support Forest Watch volunteers who assist in education efforts to promote safety and proper forest use. The warden and volunteers will also assist in event management. DNR Police Services will assist by providing additional patrols and serve to assist the wardens in the forest. Grant funds will also be used to acquire equipment to aid in the investigation of criminal activity at trailheads. The primary recreation opportunity provided by the project will be safer and more sustainable trail trailhead and campground facilities in Capitol State Forest.

The Department of Natural Resources (DNR) will use this grant to conduct education and enforcement (E&E) operations in Capitol State Forest, which is located near Olympia. The grant will fund one full-time and one half time E&E warden. The Capitol Forest has 160 miles of trail, 4 campgrounds, 6 trailheads and 560 miles of open forest roads.

The recreation wardens, will focus on ORV use compliance, identifying and correcting safety issues for all trail and road users. Additionally, the warden will support Forest Watch volunteers who assist in education efforts to promote safety and proper forest use. The warden and volunteers will also assist in event management. DNR Police Services will assist by providing additional patrols and serve to assist the wardens in the forest. Grant funds will also be used to acquire equipment to aid in the investigation of criminal activity at trailheads. The primary recreation opportunity provided by the project will be safer and more sustainable trail trailhead and campground facilities in Capitol State Forest.

RCO # 18-2464: Capitol State Forest Non-Motorized Trail & Facility Maintenance

The Department of Natural Resources will use this grant to conduct trail maintenance on 61 miles of primarily shared use (mountain bike, equestrian, running & hiking) non-motorized trails and facility maintenance at Margaret McKenny Campground & trailhead within Capitol State Forest, located near Olympia. Trail maintenance includes brushing, culvert maintenance, installing grade reversals, trail hardening, construction of short re-routes, bridges, kiosks and signs.

The forest continues to see an increase in non-motorized use, particularly mountain biking and trail running and equestrian use in winter months. The non-motorized trails are in much better shape than years ago – let’s keep this effort. 

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